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Daniel Dancer’s Art of the Sky

Inspired by the Nazca Lines in Peru environmental artist Daniel Dancer has spent the last ten years travelling the world creating over 100 images made out of people and latex paint for his 'Art of the Sky' human projects.

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The earliest instance of human choreographed art, that is best viewed from high up in the sky, dates back to the early 20th century. At a time when photography was still at it's nascent stage, Arthur Mole and John Thomas produced a series of extraordinary photographic spectacles using large groups of people to form shapes of religious and national symbols.

Daniel Dancer is the modern day Arthur Mole. Upon discovering the mysterious Nazca Lines, in South America, he wanted to create his own artistry, so he bought some paint, gathered 800 school children and made a giant salmon, in Oregon. To properly choreograph the participants in the Art of the Sky project, Daniel Dancer climbs in hot air balloons or large cranes. When everyone is in place, he asks the people to lie on their hands and knees, so the largest amount of color is exposed. In some of which works, Daniel used as many as 4000 school kids.

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