65th Anniversary of Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Drop

38 comments

Advertisement

The 65th anniversary event at the site of the world’s first A-bomb attack echoed with the choirs of schoolchildren and the solemn ringing of bells Friday as Hiroshima marked the occasion. At 8:15 a.m. – the time the bomb dropped, incinerating most of the city – a moment of silence was observed.

On Aug. 6, 1945, during World War II, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan. About 140,000 people were killed or died within months when the American B-29 “Enola Gay” bombed Hiroshima on Aug. 6, 1945. Three days later, about 80,000 people died after the United States also bombed Nagasaki. Japan surrendered on Aug. 15, ending World War II. To this day, the bombings remain the only time nuclear weapons have been unleashed.

Also see: 66th Anniversary of Operation Overlord: Normandy Landings.

TIME STOPPED BY ATOM BOMB

The Hiroshima explosion, recorded at 8:15am, August 6, 1945, is seen on the remains of a wristwatch found in the ruins in this 1945 United Nations photo. The shadow of the small hand on the eight was burned in from the blast, making it appear to be the big hand. (AP Photo/United Nations)

U.S. Air Force Plane Boeing B-29 Super-fortress Enola Gay

The B-29 superfortress Enola Gay lands at its Tinian base after its atomic bombing mission over Hiroshima on Aug. 6, 1945. (AP Photo)

LITTLE BOY ATOMIC BOMB

This is a photograph released by the U.S. government in 1960 that shows the Little Boy atom bomb, the type detonated over Hiroshima on Aug. 6, 1945. The bomb was 29 inches in diameter, 126 inches long and weighed 9,700 pounds with a yield equivalent to 20,000 tons of TNT explosive. (AP Photo)

WWII ENOLA GAY CREW

In this undated handout picture from the U.S. Air Force, the ground crew of the B-29 "Enola Gay" which bombed Hiroshima, Japan on Aug. 6, 1945 with the "Little Boy" nuclear bomb, stands with pilot Col. Paul W. Tibbets, center, in the Marianas Islands. It was the first use of nuclear weapons in warfare. (AP Photo/U.S. Air Force)

CLOUD OVER HIROSHIMA 1945

Smoke rises 20,000 feet above Hiroshima on Aug. 6, 1945 after the first atomic bomb was dropped during warfare. (AP Photo)

WWII Japan Hiroshima 1945

This picture made from the town of Yoshiura on the other side of the mountain north of Hiroshima, Japan, shows the smoke rising from the explosion of the atomic bomb at Hiroshima, Aug. 6, 1945. It was picked up from an Australian engineer at Kure, Japan. Note the radiation spots on the negative caused by the explosion of the A-bomb, almost ruining the film. (AP Photo)

WWII A-BOMB SURVIVORS HIROSHIMA

Survivors of the first atomic bomb ever used in warfare are seen as they await emergency medical treatment, on August 6, 1945, in Hiroshima, Japan. The explosion instantly killed more than 60,000 people, with ten of thousands others dying later from effects of the radioactive fallout. (AP Photo)

HIROSHIMA ATOMIC BOMB 1945

Shortly after the first atomic bomb ever used in warfare was dropped by the United States over the Japanese city of Hiroshima, survivors are seen as they receive emergency treatment by military medics, on Aug. 6, 1945. The explosion instantly killed more than 60,000 people, with ten of thousands others dying later from effects of the radioactive fallout. (AP Photo)

HIROSHIMA AFTERMATH

Rubble was all that was left after the explosion of an atomic bomb in Hiroshima, Japan, on Aug. 6, 1945. U.S. President Harry Truman ordered the first use of this nuclear weapon, which contained more power than 20,000 tons of TNT, to hasten Japan's surrender and end World War II. Japan surrendered on Aug. 14, 1945. The atomic bomb was hailed as one of the most destructive forces in history and among the greatest achievements of science. (AP Photo)

ATOMIC BOMB HIROSHIMA

A pall of smoke lingers over this scene of destruction in Hiroshima, Japan, on Aug. 7, 1945, a day after the explosion of the atomic bomb. (AP Photo)

U.S. PRESIDENT TRUMAN STIMSON

U.S. President Harry Truman, left, back from the Potsdam conference, is shown at his White House desk with Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson in Washington, D.C., Aug. 8, 1945. They discuss the atomic bomb that was dropped on Hiroshima, Japan. (AP Photo)

HIROSHIMA DESTRUCTION 1945

The shell of a building stands amid acres of rubble in this view of the Japanese city of Hiroshima, Aug. 8, 1945. (AP Photo/Mitsugi Kishida)

NAGASAKI DEVASTATION 1945

Survivors of the atomic bomb attack of Nagasaki walk through the destruction as fire rages in the background, Aug. 9, 1945. (AP Photo)

U.S. Air Force   Crew members of the Great Artiste

Crew members of 'The Great Artiste', B-29, that dropped the atomic bomb on Nagasaki, gather around Major Charles W. Sweeney, North Quincy, Mass., upon landing at Mather Field near on Nov. 8, 1945. All are members of crew that participated in historic mission. From Left to Right are; Sgt. R. Gallagher, Chicago; S. Sgt. A. M. Spitzer, Bronx, New York, Capt. C.D. Albury, Miami, Fla., Capt. J.F. Van Pelt, Jr., Oak Hill, W. Va.; Lt. F. J. Olivi, Chicago; S. Sgt. E.K. Buckley, Lisbon, Ohio; T. Sgt. A. T. Dehart, Plainview, Tex., and M. Sgt. J.D. Kuharek, Columbus, Neb. (AP Photo)

ATOMIC BOMB FAT MAN

Nagasaki Type Bomb: This is the type of atomic bomb exploded over Nagasaki, Japan, in World War II, the Atomic Energy Commission and Defense Department said in releasing this photo in Washington, December 6, 1960. The weapon, known as the "Fat Man" type, is 60 inches in diameter and 128 inches long. The second nuclear weapon to be detonated, it weighed about 10,000 pounds and had a yield equivalent to approximately 20,000 tons of high explosive. (AP Photo)

NAGASAKI MUSHROOM CLOUD

A giant column of smoke rises more than 60,000 feet into the air, after the second atomic bomb ever used in warfare explodes over the Japanese port town of Nagasaki, on August 9, 1945. Dropped by the U.S. Army Air Forces B-29 plane "Bockscar," the bomb killed more than 70,000 people instantly, with ten thousands dying later from effects of the radioactive fallout. (AP Photo)

WWII ATOMIC BOMB NAGASAKI

A massive column of billowing smoke, thousands of feet high, mushrooms over the city of Nagasaki, Japan, after an atomic bomb was dropped by the United States on Aug. 9, 1945. A B-29 plane delivered the blast killing approximately 70,000 people, with thousands dying later of radiation effects. The attack came three days after the U.S. dropped the world's first atomic bomb on the Japanese city of Hiroshima. The attacks brought about Japan's unconditional surrender, and the war ended when the papers of surrender were accepted aboard the U.S. battleship Missouri on Sept. 2, 1945. (AP Photo/U.S.Signal Corps)

WWII NAGASAKI BOMB VICTIMS

An unidentified young boy carries his burned brother on his back Aug. 10, 1945 in Nagasaki, Japan. This photographs was not released to the public by the Japanese military but was disseminated to the world press by the United Nations after the war. (AP Photo/United Nations, Yosuke Yamahata)

WWII Japan Nagasaki 1945

Arrow marks the spot where the A-bomb struck at Nagasaki, Japan, August 10, 1945. Much of the bombed area is still desolate, the trees on the hills in the background remained charred and dwarfed from the blast and little reconstruction, except of wooden shacks as homes, has taken place. (AP Photo)

WWII Japan Nagasaki 1945

Japanese workers carry away debris in a devastated area of Nagasaki, an industrial city on southwest Kyushu, after the August 9, atomic bombing, . Smokestacks and a lone building stand in background of photo, first ground view of atomic bomb damage in Nagasaki and obtained by the Army from files of Domei, official Japanese news agency. (AP Photo)

NAGASAKI STRUGGLE FOR LIFE 1945

A mother and child struggle to go on living, August 10, 1945, a day after the atomic bomb was dropped over Nagasaki, Japan. (AP Photo/United Nations)

WWII HIROSHIMA BOMBING AFTERMATH

A few steel and concrete buildings and bridges are still intact in Hiroshima after the Japanese city was hit by an atomic bomb by the U.S., during World War II Sept. 5, 1945. (AP Photo/Max Desfor)

HIROSHIMA BOMB BLAST

About one month after the dropping of the first atomic bomb on Aug. 6, 1945, an allied correspondent examines the landscape of destruction at Hiroshima, Japan. (AP Photo)

HIROSHIMA  A-BOMB VICTIM WWII

A victim of the first atomic bomb ever used in warfare is seen in September 1945, at the Ujina Branch of the First Army Hospital in Hiroshima. The thermic rays emitted by the explosion burned the pattern of this woman's kimono upon her back. (AP Photo)

HIROSHIMA DESTRUCTION 1945

All but a few scattered structures in this section of Hiroshima, Japan, have virtually disappeared in this aerial view after the August 6 atomic bomb was dropped on the city. This is the first original aerial view of the damage done by the nuclear bomb, released Sept. 1, 1945. (AP Photo/US Air Force)

HIROSHIMA DESTRUCTION

The area around the Sangyo-Shorei-Kan (Trade Promotion Hall) area of Hiroshima is laid waste, after an atomic bomb exploded within 100 meters of here in 1945. (AP Photo)

WWII HIROSHIMA AFTERMATH 

An allied correspondent stands in a sea of rubble before the shell of a building that once was a movie theater in Hiroshima Sept. 8, 1945, a month after the first atomic bomb ever used in warfare was dropped by the U.S. to hasten Japan's surrender. (AP Photo/Stanley Troutman)

HIROSHIMA DESTRUCTION 1945 

The atomic bomb attack on the Japanese city of Hiroshima, left this mass of twisted steel and this gutted building standing in acres of desolation, Sept. 8, 1945. (AP Photo

HIROSHIMA DESTRUCTION 1945

Only a handful of buildings remain standing amid the wasteland of Hiroshima, Sept. 8, 1945, the Japanese city reduced to rubble following the first atomic bomb to be dropped in warfare. (AP Photo)

HIROSHIMA DESTRUCTION 1945

Two people walk on a cleared path through the destruction resulting from the Aug. 6 detonation of the first atomic bomb, Sept. 8, 1945. (AP Photo/U.S. Air Force)

NAGASAKI DESTRUCTION 1945

A Japanese civilian salvages a piece of what was once a child's tricycle in Nagasaki, Sept. 17, 1945. A nuclear bomb was dropped on the city, Aug. 9, 1945, destroying nearly everything within a four-mile area, and instantly killing thousands of civilians. (AP Photo/ACME/Stanley Troutman)

HIROSHIMA ANNIVERSARY

In this picture provided by Japan's Association of the Photographers of the Atomic (Bomb) Destruction of Hiroshima, a nuclear bomb victim lies in quarantine on the island of Ninoshima in Hiroshima, Japan, 9,000-meter (9,843-yard) from the epicenter on Aug. 7, 1945, one day after the bombing by the United States. It was the first use of nuclear weaopns in warfare. (AP Photo/The Association of the Photographers of the Atomic (Bomb) Destruction of Hiroshima, Yotsugi Kawahara

NAGASAKI DEAD 1945

A tram, top center, is flattened in its rails and its passengers flung dead in a ditch, seen Sept. 1, 1945, following the detonation of the atomic bomb over Nagasaki of Aug. 9. (AP Photo/U.S. Army Signal Corps)

HIROSHIMA DESTRUCTION 1945

A destroyed streetcar sits on the tracks as people walk and bicycle past at the Kamiyacho intersection in Hiroshima, Japan, some time after the atomic bomb was dropped on the city. (AP Photo/Hiroshima A-Bomb Museum)

HIROSHIMA ANNIVERSARY

In this picture provided by Japan's Association of the Photographers of the Atomic (Bomb) Destruction of Hiroshima, nuclear bomb victims are sheltered at the Hiroshima Second Military Hospital's tent relief center at the banks of the Ota River in Hiroshima, Japan, 1,150-meters (1,258-yards) from the epicenter on Aug. 7, 1945, one day after the world's first nuclear bombing by the United States. (AP Photo/The Association of the Photographers of the Atomic (Bomb) Destruction of Hiroshima, Yotsugi Kawahara, HO)

HIROSHIMA DESTRUCTION 1945

A view of Hachobori Street in Hiroshima, some time after the atomic bomb was dropped on this Japanese city, date unknown. (AP Photo/ Hiroshima A-Bomb Museum)

NAGASAKI DESTRUCTION 1945

The Urakami Catholic Cathedral in Nagasaki, seen Sept. 13, 1945, is laid waste in the aftermath of the detonation of the atom bomb over a month ago over this city. (AP Photo/ACME/Stanley Troutman)

NAGASAKI DESTRUCTION 1945

A Japanese soldier sifts through debris looking for some material worth salvaging in Nagasaki, Sept. 13, 1945, a little over a month after an atomic bomb was detonated over the city. (AP Photo/ACME/Stanley Troutman)

NAGASAKI DESTRUCTION 1945

A man pushes a loaded bicycle down a cleared path in a flattened area of Nagasaki, Sept. 13, 1945, following the Aug. 9 nuclear attack by an American B-29. (AP Photo/ACME/Stanley Troutman)

NAGASAKI DESTRUCTION 1945

Japanese people, seen Sept. 14, 1945, use primitive methods to navigate rubble-strewn streets in a suburb four miles outside of Nagasaki, where a nuclear bomb was detonated over the city. (AP Photo/ACME)

NAGASAKI DESTRUCTION 1945

This area of Nagasaki, seen in 1945, was crowded with industrial buildings and small residences. In the background are the remains of the Mitsubishi arms factory and a reinforced concrete school building at the foot of the hills. (AP Photo/U.S. Army)

NAGASAKI DESTRUCTION 1945

The city of Nagasaki is shown as a teeming urban area, above, then as a flattened, desolate moonscape following the detonation of an atomic bomb, below. Circles delineate the thousands of feet from ground zero. (AP Photo)

NAGASAKI DEVASTATION 1945

A Japanese family eats rice in the crude shack they built from the wreckage left on the spot where their home once stood in Nagasaki, Sept. 14, 1945. (AP Photo)

NAGASAKI DESTRUCTION 1945 

These shacks, seen Sept. 14, 1945, were made from scraps of debris from buildings that were leveled in the aftermath of the atomic bomb that was dropped over Nagasaki. (AP Photo)

NAGASAKI DEVASTATION 1945

Bombed out shopkeepers sell goods on the sidewalks in Nagasaki in the Ginza district, a district comparable to New York's Fifth Avenue, Sept. 30, 1945. (AP Photo/ACME)

A-BOMB NAGASAKI AFTERMATH WWII

A sacred Torii Gate stands erect over the completely destroyed area of a Shinto shrine in Nagasaki, in October 1945, after the second atomic bomb ever used in warfare was dropped by the U.S. over the Japanese industrial center. Due to its structure, the blast of the explosion could go around it, therefore leaving the arch intact. The bombing killed more than 70,000 people instantly, with ten thousands dying later from effects of the radioactive fallout. (AP Photo)

HIROSHIMA DESTRUCTION

Church services continued in the Nagarekawa Protestant Church in 1945 after the atomic bomb destroyed the church in Hiroshima. (AP Photo/Nagarekawa Church)

NAGASAKI  A-BOMB VICTIM WWII

This young man, a victim of the second atomic bomb ever used in warfare, is seen as he is lying sick on a mat, in Nagasaki, in late 1945. The bombing killed more than 70,000 people instantly, with ten thousands dying later from effects of the radioactive fallout. (AP Photo)

FEREBEE BEAHAN

Maj. Thomas Ferebee, left, of Mocksville, N.C., and Capt. Kermit Beahan, right, of Houston, Texas, talk at a hotel in Washington, D.C., on Feb. 6, 1946. Ferebee dropped the atomic bomb over Hiroshima, and Beahan dropped the bomb over Nagasaki. They are summoned to the nation's capital from Roswell Field, N.M., to prepare for the joint Army-Navy atomic bomb testing on target warships at Bikini atoll next May. (AP Photo)

NAGASAKI DESTRUCTION 

U.S. Navy sailors look through debris in the bomb-devastated city of Nagasaki, March 4, 1946. (AP Photo)

WWII AFTERMATH HIROSHIMA 

This photo shows the total destruction of the city of Hiroshima, Japan, on April 1, 1946. The atomic bomb known as "Little Boy" was dropped over Hiroshima on Aug. 6, 1945 during World War II from the U.S. AAF Superfortress bomber plane called "Enola Gay." (AP Photo)

HIROSHIMA WOUNDED

Ikimi Kikkawa shows keloid scars following the healing of burns caused by the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima at the end of the second World War. She was seen at the Red Cross hospital there, June 5, 1947. (AP Photo)

HIROSHIMA WOUNDED

Akira Yamaguchi shows his heavy scars, June 5, 1947, a result of the healing of burns sustained from the atomic bomb attack of Hiroshima. (AP Photo/U.S. Army)

TERAVAMA  A-BOMB SURVIVOR

A survivor of the first atomic bomb ever used in warfare, Jinpe Teravama retains scars after healing of burns from the bomb explosion, Hiroshima, in June 1947. (AP Photo)

WWII FIRST A-BOMB

Commanding officer and pilot Col. Paul W. Tibbets Jr. waves from the cockpit of his bomber plane at its base in Tinian, on August 6, 1945, shortly before take-off to drop the first atomic bomb over Hiroshima, Japan. The day before Tibbets named the B-29 Superfortress after his mother "Enola Gay." (AP Photo)

[via Denverpost.com]

Subscribe to our Newsletter and get articles like this delieverd straight to your inbox

38 comments:

  1. Now we learn that Japan was losing the War. Why did U.S. Drop the Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima ???? Killing Woman and Kids??????

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. becuz they wanted to fuck the men

      Delete
    2. if you make a research on Japanese characters, you will know that it is not easy to ask them to stop the war..They think their emperor is GOD, they believe their GOD can win the war and think it is nothing wrong to kill people from other countries..(Japanese soldiers area very cruel to Prisoner of war, they didn't regard them as people, but as animals and losers)...The atomic bomb is awful, yes, we can admit it, but sometimes war can make people crazy, if you didn't find some way to calm them down, i believe they always find excuses to justify their behavior.

      Delete
    3. Hiroshima was an industrial city used for production towards the Japanese war effort. Japan housed families in these areas in spite its obvious target potential. Hiroshima was also chosen because it had not been previously bombed to any great degree, and the effects of the atomic bomb could be better studied. And it's true as stated by another poster, Japan did not "know" how to surrender, and the nut cases in the Japanese military expected the nation to die fighting to the end. The atomic bombs convinced the emperor to finally step in and surrender to the terms outlined in the Allied Power's Potsdam Declaration.

      Delete
    4. Why? Because they fucked with us first!

      Delete
  2. I think that you know your history. Yes we were winning the war, but hundreds of thousands more marines would die in hand to hand combat efforts on the mainland. Never a second thought, especialy considering:
    1.) Now that we have learned Japan was floating bombs over the Pacific via the jet stream, with no regard to "woman or children"
    2.) Germany was to deliver 1/2 ton of Uranium to Japan in 1945. Thankfully we found and sunk the u-boat that was delivering. Do you think the Japs would have not used it on us if they had a chance?

    Get a real grip. War is not pretty or logical.

    ReplyDelete
  3. to 2): japan wouldn't had time or the knolidge to do the bomb. USA had done it many years and spended hundreds or millions. Japans would had a year?, and no knowlidge or money.

    ReplyDelete
  4. to 1)This was a failed attempt, killed a couple of people in all.

    to 2)Germany got nowhere with their bomb project. They were finished in 1945, no means to deliver anything to Japan.

    The mass destruction of civilians is a kind of genocide. Yes the Japanese military did it too, still doesn't justify more killing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's know paradox. There are 4 tied people on the track but you can change the tracks! There will be only 2 tied people. Will you kill 2 people to save 4 or let 4 die saying "well, at least I didn't kill anyone".
      That's your choice and your responsibility and burden whatever you choose.

      Delete
  5. Any acts that deliberately target civilian targets is criminal. Ends do not justify the means.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In Unicorn universe they are

      Delete
    2. Judging the past with the morality of the present does a disservice to both.

      In fact, Hiroshima was a military target, not a civilian one. It was a central hub for industry, military command, and communication. If Tokyo fell, it would have become the capital. Does that make indiscriminate bombing "OK?" No. Nothing in war, by its very nature, is "OK." It was how war was fought by all nations during that time frame and none found it to be immoral. To know the aftermath prior to declaring it immoral is a luxury no one had at that time in history.

      No nation with such technology would have refrained from using it in the 1940's, but using it made every nation think twice before ever using one again. For that, we should just be thankful that a lesson was learned and has not needed to be repeated.

      Delete
  6. War is sad but this was necessary. Many in the sixties thought a small nuclear bomb, over North
    Vietnam would have save tens of thousands of
    our Soldiers and perhaps a victory instead of defeat. Very tough subject.

    ReplyDelete
  7. The bomb was designed to explode at 5,000 feet above ground in order to kill as many civilians as possible, and also to intimidate the Russians. "God Bless America" you say, after their genocide, I doubt he ever will!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Think about what Japan did to their neighbors, especially Nanking, Korea, Philippines, POWs,women and children. Japan got what they asked for.

    ReplyDelete
  9. We did what we had to do. Many of our Fathers and Grandfathers would have died invading Japan. U.S. casualty estimates were approximately 1 million in the invasion senerio. Japan had 2-3 million troops waiting for us.

    ReplyDelete
  10. My grandfather was there, a member of occupying forces who saw the direct aftermath of the bombings as well as participating in active combat beforehand. In his own words: "That [atomic bombing] wasn't war. That was something else. And if that's the new face of war, then may God have mercy on us all." He died of cancer in 1976, due to radiation exposure. May God have mercy on him.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My dad was also a member of forces occupying Nagasaki and Hiroshima Japan AFTER the bombing. He had cancer and died in 2001 (age 75) My 86 year old mother is still living w/o him.

      Delete
    2. I agree, May God have mercy on the USA. This nation was founded with God in mind.( In God we Trust)W. I do not believe that is the case today, we need to turn this Country back to God if we want his Mercy and Blessings.

      Delete
  11. The Japanese bombed the military base in Pearl harbour .In return America use nuclear bombs on 2 populated Japanese cities with innocent people in them. They took revenge out of woman and children who were not responsible at all. The High Rank Japanese officials who were responsible for the pearl Harbour bombing most of them died of natural causes they were not hit by the American planes. Unfortunately the innocent always pays for their government decisions.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Come on now.The Japanese did much more than attack military positions in Asia.They had "scientific research" similar to the Nazi's.They were cruel and had no morals.Don't simplify it to just the Pearl Harbor attack.There was much more complicated things going on.It's easy to criticize what was done,sure it was a horrible thing.Unfortunately as bad as it was it was probably the way with the fewest deaths over all.Don't blame the US,blame the Japanese military and emporer.They had every chance to surrender and did not.

      Delete
  12. Most of the casualties of the bombing were civilians, they might have roles in supporting the war started by their own country. But many of them hadn't chose to do so. They could be women losing their husbands in the war; parents knowing their sons died battling; kids being informed their fathers wouldn't come back. I think those kids would not encourage their fathers to go to the war. Then why these people needed to be punished?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Why German civilians had to be punished? They did nothing wrong. They just worked hard to produce tanks and bombs for their country. They just were patriots.
      Can't believe you ask these questions about war. There's no logic. War just sucks. Never start one.

      Delete
  13. The atomic bombing was a simple escalation of a campaign that was already ongoing. B-29's were on a constant flow of bombing missions into many cities with military and industrial targets, often with innocent casualties. That campaign was not going to stop and the invasion was already planned. The use of the atomic bombs was no more terrible than the war that was already raging. The use of the atomic bombs was simply a matter of using something bigger to do the same job. Fortunately the result was so shocking that Japan surrendered. Prior to that, the bombing raids were seen by Hirohito as manageable and was probably why he refused to surrender. More lives may have been lost due to his indefference and blind ambition.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dress it up how you like it .. Wars are for profit, no more no less .. Older men declare war and foolish, patriotic, gung-ho idiots fight wars for the super rich .. it's a game of monopoly being played with young people who don't know history, who don't know the debts of deceit and duplicity the U.S. is capable of.. There have been U.S. Senators and even former Presidents who have spoke out against War and no one was listening then, just as no one is listening now..

      "There is still a voice crying into the vista of time saying to every potential Peter, put up your sword. History is replete with the bleached bones of nations and communities that failed to follow this command." ~ MLK .. and it's a universal command, not a biblical one because religion is another colossal ruse ... WAKE UP PEOPLE .. WAR IS WRONG !!!!

      Delete
    2. There is still a voice crying into the vista of time saying to every potential Peter, put up your sword. History is replete with the bleached bones of nations and communities that failed to follow this command.

      Delete
  14. In the history of War, America is still the only nation to ever use the A-Bomb, and we used it twice.. over 100,000 people killed immediately and hundreds of thousands more killed in the following months and years. For those of you who are saying that it was "necessary" I'm sure you would think twice if Japan would have dropped the A-bomb on a US city killing thousands of innocent women, babies, children, who have nothing to do with the wars created by evil, greedy men. War is WRONG no matter how you look at it.. Those of you who are pro-military, you have a lot more evolving to do ...

    ReplyDelete
  15. Pretty soon all of you who are "educated" via the internet will say that 9/11 was justifiable for all that "America" does to hold down the Islamic countries. Most Islamic countries CHOOSE to live in "ancient" ways yet they still choose to attack innocent people. Hiroshima was an industrial area that CHOSE to use their civilians as a "SHIELD". Nagasaki also had industrial as well as military areas and AGAIN they used theor civilians as a "SHIELD". Was it necesssary to drop the bombs??? Was it necessary to have Pearl Harbour attacked, which also had civilian casualties, albeit, not to the extent of Japan (then again we didn't use our civilians as shields). Was it necessary to have Germany invade most of Europe or have concentration camps that "exterminated" innocent women and children? What ya'll should be taking away from history is HOW NOT TO REPEAT IT!!! So, again, I ask , was it necessary to drop the bombs??? In a word, YES. It was tragic, it was heinous, but it saved more lives than it had taken. Not only in WWII but also EVERY WAR or CONFLICT that has occurred on this Earth since!!!! History proves that point.

    ReplyDelete
  16. My comment is in three of my own post ------------- .http://theum-graylock.blogspot.com/2014/11/there-are-other-sidewalks.html ------------- http://theum-graylock.blogspot.com/2014/12/from-these-sidewalks.html ------------- http://octoberwb.blogspot.com/2012/08/blog-post_4425.html ------------- it's not much and sorry about the double posting, if that has happened. think I understand most of the comment as well as your own. My own church was opposed to these bombs. Fat Boy managed to blow up the largest Christian Cathedral in Asia. But the men who dropped it were in the most dangerous service of that War ( except for the Frog Men). Clark Gable (a well known Actor of 1940's and 50's) was a waist gunner on a B-17 Bomber. On his third mission over Germany his fellow waist gunner he called the Kid was shredded wilst standing at Gable's side. He held him all the way back to there home base. Gable never went up again he,s nerve's crashed. This was a hellish, dangerous and often fatal contest and all Air Men wanted it ended pronto. When it did end every America combatant saluted the Sky Guys. In hind sight we can see the hellish devil we have realest. You should thank what ever you believe in the other guys didn't get it first. --- tics

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "...In hind sight we can see the hellish devil we have realest."-Pal you have really got to use that spellchecker, or go back to school.

      Delete
  17. For heaven's sakes, those that comment regarding the cruelty of what the US did to Japanese civilians clearly don't know much about their 1940s history. Do you know/understand what happened there? Ask the civilians of Mongolia. Ask the civilians of Singapore. Ask the civilians of the Phillipines. The Japanese killed and tortured them for the pure enjoyment of it. Purpose? To intimidate. US did it as last resort, due to what several posters with common sense already stated: the Japanese government would not allow a surrender until forced, it was against their god/emperor. The US would have had to attack the mainland of Japan, the planning stages were already in effect... do you think civilians would have been killed doing that? Many more than the bomb killed, plus many US soldiers. Needless. Truman did the only thing he could: make the difficult decision to use the bomb in order to limit the casualties. I know, sounds crazy, but its true. Read history, talk to someone that was there... a few are still with us.

    ReplyDelete
  18. I pray to our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ, that this never ever happens again. NGC.

    ReplyDelete

Amusing Planet appreciates your comments, except when they are SPAM. Such comments will be deleted immediately before they appear on this page. Spamming is futile, so please avoid.

To ensure that this page is free of spam, all comments are moderated, so it may take a while for your comments to appear.