Island Homes During Mississippi River Flooding

4 comments

When the waters of the Mississippi River broke in April 2011, it created one of the largest and the most damaging floods in the U.S. in the past century. Flooding was caused by two major storm systems that deposited record levels of rainfall on the Mississippi River watershed. When that additional water combined with the springtime snowmelt, the river and many of its tributaries began to swell and spill over. Certain areas were inundated with 20-30 feet of water forcing evacuation of tens of thousands of homes in areas along the Mississippi and the Yazoo River. But many decided to stay put building dykes around their houses instead, creating tiny island homes.

mississippi-flooding-7

A levee protects a home surrounded by floodwater from the Yazoo River on May 18, 2011 near Vicksburg, Mississippi. The flooded Mississippi River is forcing the Yazoo River to top its banks where the two meet near Vicksburg causing towns and farms upstream on the Yazoo to flood. (Photo: Scott Olson)

mississippi-flooding-5

A levee partially protects a home surrounded by floodwater from the Yazoo River, on May 18, 2011 near Vicksburg, Mississippi. (Photo: Scott Olson)

mississippi-flooding-10

A house in Vicksburg, situated along the Yazoo River, surrounded with tons of earth and sand. Photo: Getty Images

mississippi-flooding-11

A house in Vicksburg, situated along the Yazoo River, surrounded with tons of earth and sand. Photo: Getty Images

mississippi-flooding-13

A house in Vicksburg, situated along the Yazoo River, surrounded with tons of earth and sand. Photo: Getty Images

mississippi-flooding-14

This aerial shot over Vicksburg shows the ominous rise of floodwater around homes. Photo: Getty Images

mississippi-flooding-1

A flooded home surrounded by a makeshift levee that failed in Vicksburg, Mississippi, is pictured Tuesday, May 17, 2011. (Photo: Dave Martin)

mississippi-flooding-6

Brittany Pearce (right) stands atop a mound of sandbags in front of her grandparents' house in Stephensville, Louisiana, on May 15, 2011. (Photo: Sean Gardner)

mississippi-flooding-8

Volunteers fill sandbags to help in the fight against rising floodwater May 7, 2011 in Memphis, Tennessee. (Photo: Scott Olson)

mississippi-flooding-2

Tugboat owner Jerry Vatson walks across a makeshift walkway from a barge where his boat is anchored to land, amidst rising floodwater from the Mississippi River, in Vidalia, Louisiana, on Tuesday, May 17, 2011. (Photo: Gerald Herbert)

mississippi-flooding-4

A boat carrying prison trustees, who are used as workers against the flood, motors through Mississippi River floodwaters, past the Riverside Medical Complex, which is protected by a wall of Hesco baskets in Vidalia, Louisiana, on Thursday, May 19, 2011. (Photo: Gerald Herbert)

mississippi-flooding-15

Sandbags laid out in piles protect a road in Stepensville, Louisiana. Photo: Getty Images

mississippi-flooding-16

Dennis Barkemeyer (right) inspects a temporary levee built around a medical center in Vidalia, Louisiana. Photo: Getty Images

mississippi-flooding-3

Submerged buildings are seen near Lake Providence, Louisiana, on May 18, 2011. (Photo: Eric Thayer)

mississippi-flooding-9

Sources: The Atlantic / Daily Mail

Subscribe to our Newsletter and get articles like this delieverd straight to your inbox

You may also like:

4 comments:

  1. the pictures look amazing and also terrible forces of nature

    ReplyDelete
  2. This was a show of defiance. For most people without access to the equipment or insurance to replace everything, this is like saving a $1,000 car with $25,000 worth of work. No insurance an access to the equipment and plenty of earth = almost free. Good for them!

    ReplyDelete
  3. In Holland, or the Netherlands, we do it the same way, levies around the whole country, but before we used: An artificial dwelling hill (known as Terp, Wierde, Woerd, Warf, Warft, Werf, Wurt and Værft) is a mound, created to provide safe ground during high tide and river floods. These hills occur in the coastal parts of the Netherlands (in the provinces of Zeeland, Friesland and Groningen), in southern parts of Denmark and in Germany where, before dikes were made, tides interfered with daily life. They also occur in the Rhine and Meuse river plains in the central part of the Netherlands.(wiki)

    ReplyDelete
  4. the pictures look amazing and also terrible forces of nature

    ReplyDelete

Amusing Planet appreciates your comments, except when they are SPAM. Such comments will be deleted immediately before they appear on this page. Spamming is futile, so please avoid.

To ensure that this page is free of spam, all comments are moderated, so it may take a while for your comments to appear.